R. Rose Style

A Rose by any other name is just not who I am.

4,172 notes

johndarnielle:

you know what
I loved unicorns when I was eleven/twelve years old and then I learned that it was real soft and nerdy to love unicorns so I checked out of the whole unicorn-liking mindset because I felt a need to be hardening myself and copping a dark-stuff-only stance
then when I was 19 my girlfriend gave me a coffee cup with a unicorn on it and on receiving it I discovered that I had internalized some bullshit anti-unicorn stance and it made me sad
to those unicorns who didn’t get liked by me during my bullshit years: my bad, do you like carrots, I will leave a plate of carrots out by the back door, I also have oats

johndarnielle:

you know what

I loved unicorns when I was eleven/twelve years old and then I learned that it was real soft and nerdy to love unicorns so I checked out of the whole unicorn-liking mindset because I felt a need to be hardening myself and copping a dark-stuff-only stance

then when I was 19 my girlfriend gave me a coffee cup with a unicorn on it and on receiving it I discovered that I had internalized some bullshit anti-unicorn stance and it made me sad

to those unicorns who didn’t get liked by me during my bullshit years: my bad, do you like carrots, I will leave a plate of carrots out by the back door, I also have oats

(via todbrowning)

564 notes

raboartcollection:

Light, space and time make us aware of what surrounds us. For JCJ Vanderheyden, this concept is at once both the starting point and the conclusion. Vanderheyden focuses on reality and art history, examining what our eye sees and what we take in. A clear blue sky, an endless horizon or the world as a stage. Throughout his body of work over the years, set themes recur, which the artist reuses and rearranges in new ways, adding a level of significance to the temporal aspect of his work.
JCJ Vanderheyden, After Hieronymus Bosch (1998)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection

raboartcollection:

Light, space and time make us aware of what surrounds us. For JCJ Vanderheyden, this concept is at once both the starting point and the conclusion. Vanderheyden focuses on reality and art history, examining what our eye sees and what we take in. A clear blue sky, an endless horizon or the world as a stage. Throughout his body of work over the years, set themes recur, which the artist reuses and rearranges in new ways, adding a level of significance to the temporal aspect of his work.

JCJ Vanderheyden, After Hieronymus Bosch (1998)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

(Source: rabokunstcollectie.nl, via medusaspajamas)